Naked Statues Fat Gladiators and War Elephants

Naked Statues  Fat Gladiators  and War Elephants
Author: Garrett Ryan
Publsiher: Rowman & Littlefield
Total Pages: 288
Release: 2021-09-01
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781633887039

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Why didn't the ancient Greeks or Romans wear pants? How did they shave? How likely were they to drink fine wine, use birth control, or survive surgery? In a series of short and humorous essays, Naked Statues, Fat Gladiators, and War Elephants explores some of the questions about the Greeks and Romans that ancient historian Garrett Ryan has answered in the classroom and online. Unlike most books on the classical world, the focus is not on famous figures or events, but on the fascinating details of daily life. Learn the answers to: How tall were the ancient Greeks and Romans? How long did they live? What kind of pets did they have? How dangerous were their cities? Did they believe their myths? Did they believe in ghosts, monsters, and/or aliens? Did they jog or lift weights? How did they capture animals for the Colosseum? Were there secret police, spies, or assassins? What happened to the city of Rome after the Empire collapsed? Can any families trace their ancestry back to the Greeks or Romans?

The Carthaginian Empire

The Carthaginian Empire
Author: Nathan Pilkington
Publsiher: Lexington Books
Total Pages: 227
Release: 2019-10-04
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781498590532

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The Carthaginian Empire: 550 – 202 BCE argues for a new history of the Phoenician polity. In contrast to previous studies of the Carthaginian Empire that privileged evidence from Greco-Roman sources, Nathan Pilkington bases his study on evidence preserved in the archaeological and epigraphic records of Carthage and its colonies and dependencies. Using this evidence, Pilkington demonstrates that the Carthaginian Empire of the 6th– 4th centuries BCE — as recovered archaeologically and epigraphically — bears little resemblance to currently accepted historical reconstructions. He then presents an independent archaeological and epigraphic reconstruction of the Carthaginian Empire. In this presentation, the author argues that the Carthaginian Empire developed later, chronologically, and was less extensive, geographically, than reconstructions based on the Greco-Roman source tradition suggest. Pilkington further shows that Carthage developed a similar infrastructure of imperial power to those developed in Rome and Athens. Like its contemporaries, Carthage used colonization, the establishment of metropolitan political institutions at dependent polities, and the reorganization of trade into a metropolitan hub-and-spoke system to develop imperial control over subordinated territories.

Stick a Flag in It

Stick a Flag in It
Author: Arran Lomas
Publsiher: Unbound Publishing
Total Pages: 364
Release: 2020-10-01
Genre: Humor
ISBN: 9781783529155

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From the Norman Invasion in 1066 to the eve of the First World War, Stick a Flag in It is a thousand-year jocular journey through the history of Britain and its global empire. The British people have always been eccentric, occasionally ingenious and, sure, sometimes unhinged – from mad monarchs to mass-murdering lepers. Here, Arran Lomas shows us how they harnessed those traits to forge the British nation, and indeed the world, we know today. Follow history’s greatest adventurers from the swashbuckling waters of the Caribbean to the vast white wasteland of the Antarctic wilderness, like the British spy who infiltrated a top-secret Indian brothel and the priest who hid inside a wall but forgot to bring a packed lunch. At the very least you’ll discover Henry VIII’s favourite arse-wipe, whether the flying alchemist ever made it from Scotland to France, and the connection between Victorian coffee houses and dildos. Forget what you were taught in school – this is history like you’ve never heard it before, full of captivating historical quirks that will make you laugh out loud and scratch your head in disbelief.

Greek Cities and Roman Governors

Greek Cities and Roman Governors
Author: Garrett Ryan
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 193
Release: 2021-07-29
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781000424959

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This volume uses the travels of Roman governors to explore how authority was defined in and by the public places of Greek cities. By demonstrating that the places where imperial officials and local notables met were integral to the strategies by which they communicated with one another, Greek Cities and Roman Governors sheds new light on the significance of civic space in the Roman provinces. It also presents a fresh perspective on the monumental cityscapes of Roman Asia Minor, epicenter of the greatest building boom in classical history. Though of special interest to scholars and students of Roman Asia Minor, Greek Cities and Roman Governors offers broad insights into Roman imperialism and the ancient city.

The Cult of Mithras in Late Antiquity

The Cult of Mithras in Late Antiquity
Author: David Walsh
Publsiher: BRILL
Total Pages: 158
Release: 2018-11-29
Genre: History
ISBN: 9789004383067

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In The Cult of Mithras in Late Antiquity David Walsh examines how and why the cult of Mithras vanished from the Roman Empire by the early 5th century C.E.

Sulla the Fortunate

Sulla the Fortunate
Author: G. P. Baker
Publsiher: Rowman & Littlefield
Total Pages: 329
Release: 2001-05-08
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781461741688

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Lucius Cornelius Sulla (138-78 BC), soldier, politician, and statesman, set the standard of dictator for the generations that followed his death—the most famous dictator to follow Sulla's systematic path to power was Julius Caesar. In his lifetime, Sulla faced issues such as the decay of religious faith, the end of the aristocracy, the rise of the proletariat, and the growth of international finance. It was unquestionably a momentous era in the world's history, and Sulla's story is a tale of the Roman ambition par excellence: alliances, battles against rival Roman armies, plots, assassinations, and a civil war initiated by Sulla himself in which he seized power.

The Teacher in Ancient Rome

The Teacher in Ancient Rome
Author: Lisa Maurice
Publsiher: Lexington Books
Total Pages: 264
Release: 2013-08-22
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780739179093

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The Teacher in Ancient Rome: The Magister and His World by Lisa Maurice investigates a particular aspect of education in ancient Rome, namely the figure of the teacher. After identifying and defining the different kinds of teachers in the Roman education systems, Maurice illuminates their ways of life both as both professionals and members of society. This text surveys the physical environment in which teachers worked, as well as the methods, equipment, and techniques used in the classroom. Slavery, patronage, and the social and financial status of the various types of teachers are considered in depth. Maurice examines ideological issues surrounding teachers, discussing the idealized figure of the teacher and the frequent differences between this ideal and actual educators. Also explored are the challenges posed by the interaction of Greek and Roman culture—and later between paganism and Christianity—and how these social clashes affected those responsible for educating the youth of society. The Teacher in Ancient Rome is a comprehensive treatment of a figure instantly recognizable yet strikingly different from that of the modern teacher.

Evil Roman Emperors

Evil Roman Emperors
Author: Phillip Barlag
Publsiher: Rowman & Littlefield
Total Pages: 237
Release: 2021-06-15
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781633886919

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Nero fiddled while Rome burned. As catchy as that aphorism is, it’s sadly untrue, even if it has a nice ring to it. The one thing Nero is well-known for is the one thing he actually didn’t do. But fear not, the truth of his life, his rule and what he did with unrestrained power, is plenty weird, salacious and horrifying. And he is not alone. Roman history, from the very foundation of the city, is replete with people and stories that shock our modern sensibilities. Evil Roman Emperors puts the worst of Rome’s rulers in one place and offers a review of their lives and a historical context for what made them into what they became. It concludes by ranking them, counting down to the worst ruler in Rome’s long history. Lucius Tarquinius Suburbus called peace conferences with warring states, only to slaughter foreign leaders; Commodus sold offices of the empire to the highest bidder; Caligula demanded to be worshipped as a god, and marched troops all the way to the ocean simply to collect seashells as “proof” of their conquest; even the Roman Senate itself was made up of oppressors, exploiters, and murderers of all stripes. Author Phillip Barlag profiles a host of evil Roman rulers across the history of their empire, along with the faceless governing bodies that condoned and even carried out heinous acts. Roman history, deviant or otherwise, is a subject of endless fascination. What’s never been done before is to look at the worst of the worst at the same time, comparing them side by side, and ranking them against one another. Until now.