The Banality of Evil

The Banality of Evil
Author: Bernard J. Bergen
Publsiher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
Total Pages: 192
Release: 2000-01-01
Genre: Philosophy
ISBN: 9780585116969

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This highly original book is the first to explore the political and philosophical consequences of Hannah Arendt's concept of 'the banality of evil,' a term she used to describe Adolph Eichmann, architect of the Nazi 'final solution.' According to Bernard J. Bergen, the questions that preoccupied Arendt were the meaning and significance of the Nazi genocide to our modern times. As Bergen describes Arendt's struggle to understand 'the banality of evil,' he shows how Arendt redefined the meaning of our most treasured political concepts and principles_freedom, society, identity, truth, equality, and reason_in light of the horrific events of the Holocaust. Arendt concluded that the banality of evil results from the failure of human beings to fully experience our common human characteristics_thought, will, and judgment_and that the exercise and expression of these attributes is the only chance we have to prevent a recurrence of the kind of terrible evil perpetrated by the Nazis.

Eichmann in Jerusalem

Eichmann in Jerusalem
Author: Hannah Arendt
Publsiher: Penguin
Total Pages: 337
Release: 2006-09-22
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 9781101007167

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The controversial journalistic analysis of the mentality that fostered the Holocaust, from the author of The Origins of Totalitarianism Sparking a flurry of heated debate, Hannah Arendt’s authoritative and stunning report on the trial of German Nazi leader Adolf Eichmann first appeared as a series of articles in The New Yorker in 1963. This revised edition includes material that came to light after the trial, as well as Arendt’s postscript directly addressing the controversy that arose over her account. A major journalistic triumph by an intellectual of singular influence, Eichmann in Jerusalem is as shocking as it is informative—an unflinching look at one of the most unsettling (and unsettled) issues of the twentieth century.

The Evil of Banality

The Evil of Banality
Author: Elizabeth K. Minnich
Publsiher: Rowman & Littlefield
Total Pages: 256
Release: 2016-12-07
Genre: Philosophy
ISBN: 9781442275973

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Asking, How could they do it? about the many ordinary people who have been perpetrators and those who resist extensive evils—genocide, human trafficking, endemic sexualized violations of females, economic exploitation—the book delves into historic, contemporary, national, and international examples. The author, a moral philosopher, draws also on literature, psychology, economics, journalism, pop culture. Reversing Arendt’s banality of evil, she finds that mind-deadening banality, thoughtless conventionality, ambition, greed, status-seeking enable the evil of banality.

Eichmann in Jerusalem

Eichmann in Jerusalem
Author: Hannah Arendt
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 312
Release: 1970
Genre: Electronic Book
ISBN: OCLC:174202116

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The Banality of Good and Evil

The Banality of Good and Evil
Author: David R. Blumenthal
Publsiher: Georgetown University Press
Total Pages: 340
Release: 1999-04-05
Genre: Religion
ISBN: 1589014251

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People who helped exterminate Jews during the shoah (Hebrew for "holocaust") often claimed that they only did what was expected of them. Intrigued by hearing the same response from individuals who rescued Jews, David R. Blumenthal proposes that the notion of ordinariness used to characterize Nazi evil is equally applicable to goodness. In this provocative book, Blumenthal develops a new theory of human behavior that identifies the social and psychological factors that foster both good and evil behavior. Drawing on lessons primarily from the shoah but also from well-known obedience and altruism experiments, My Lai, and the civil rights movement, Blumenthal deftly interweaves insights from psychology, history, and social theory to create a new way of looking at human behavior. Blumenthal identifies the factors — social hierarchy, education, and childhood discipline — that shape both good and evil attitudes and actions. Considering how our religious and educational institutions might do a better job of encouraging goodness and discouraging evil, he then makes specific recommendations for cultivating goodness in people, stressing the importance of the social context of education. He reinforces his ideas through stories, teachings, and case histories from the Jewish tradition that convey important lessons in resistance and goodness. Appendices include the ethical code of the Israel Defense Forces, material on non-violence from the Martin Luther King, Jr., Center, a suggested syllabus for a Jewish elementary school, and a list of prosocial sources on the Web, as well as a complete bibliography. If people can commit acts of evil without thinking, why can’t even more commit acts of kindness? Writing with power and insight, Blumenthal shows readers of all faiths how we might replace patterns of evil with empathy, justice, and caring, and through a renewed attention to moral education, perhaps prevent future shoahs.

The Life of the Mind

The Life of the Mind
Author: Hannah Arendt
Publsiher: HMH
Total Pages: 543
Release: 1981-03-16
Genre: Philosophy
ISBN: 9780547541471

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“A passionate, humane intelligence addressing itself to the fundamental problem of how the mind operates.” —Newsweek Considered by many to be Hannah Arendt’s greatest work, published as she neared the end of her life, The Life of the Mind investigates thought itself, as it exists in contemplative life. In a shift from her previous writings, most of which focus on the world outside the mind, this work was planned as three volumes that would explore the activities of the mind considered by Arendt to be fundamental. What emerged is a rich, challenging analysis of human mental activity, considered in terms of thinking, willing, and judging. This final achievement, presented here in a complete one-volume edition, may be seen as a legacy to our own and future generations.

Eichmann Before Jerusalem

Eichmann Before Jerusalem
Author: Bettina Stangneth
Publsiher: Vintage
Total Pages: 495
Release: 2014-09-02
Genre: Biography & Autobiography
ISBN: 9780307959683

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A total and groundbreaking reassessment of the life of Adolf Eichmann—a superb work of scholarship that reveals his activities and notoriety among a global network of National Socialists following the collapse of the Third Reich and that permanently challenges Hannah Arendt’s notion of the “banality of evil.” Smuggled out of Europe after the collapse of Germany, Eichmann managed to live a peaceful and active exile in Argentina for years before his capture by the Mossad. Though once widely known by nicknames such as “Manager of the Holocaust,” in 1961 he was able to portray himself, from the defendant’s box in Jerusalem, as an overworked bureaucrat following orders—no more, he said, than “just a small cog in Adolf Hitler’s extermination machine.” How was this carefully crafted obfuscation possible? How did a central architect of the Final Solution manage to disappear? And what had he done with his time while in hiding? Bettina Stangneth, the first to comprehensively analyze more than 1,300 pages of Eichmann’s own recently discovered written notes— as well as seventy-three extensive audio reel recordings of a crowded Nazi salon held weekly during the 1950s in a popular district of Buenos Aires—draws a chilling portrait, not of a reclusive, taciturn war criminal on the run, but of a highly skilled social manipulator with an inexhaustible ability to reinvent himself, an unrepentant murderer eager for acolytes with whom to discuss past glories while vigorously planning future goals with other like-minded fugitives. A work that continues to garner immense international attention and acclaim, Eichmann Before Jerusalem maps out the astonishing links between innumerable past Nazis—from ace Luftwaffe pilots to SS henchmen—both in exile and in Germany, and reconstructs in detail the postwar life of one of the Holocaust’s principal organizers as no other book has done

The Banality of Evil

The Banality of Evil
Author: Ana Rubio-Serrano
Publsiher: Babelcube Inc.
Total Pages: 137
Release: 2021-03-29
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781071594841

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The aim of this book is not only to show the historical Auschwitz but the Auschwitz that has taken root in human beings: first, the inability to distinguish between good and evil; second, the obsession for reaffirming one's own identity as uniquely human and third, the impossibility of thinking about otherness. Even today, Auschwitz persists as a legacy, of which our world is both executor and heir. Auschwitz is, therefore, the starting point, but not the endpoint. This book is a study that shows the model of the anti-human that is born of Nazi anthropology, contrary to the model of man revealed by Christian anthropology. A humanistically oriented theological and philosophical examination of the "banality of evil" within the universe of the Nazi extermination camps.