Shadows at Dawn

Shadows at Dawn
Author: Karl Jacoby
Publsiher: Penguin
Total Pages: 384
Release: 2009-11-24
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781101159514

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A masterful reconstruction of one of the worst Indian massacres in American history In April 1871, a group of Americans, Mexicans, and Tohono O?odham Indians surrounded an Apache village at dawn and murdered nearly 150 men, women, and children in their sleep. In the past century the attack, which came to be known as the Camp Grant Massacre, has largely faded from memory. Now, drawing on oral histories, contemporary newspaper reports, and the participants? own accounts, prize-winning author Karl Jacoby brings this perplexing incident and tumultuous era to life to paint a sweeping panorama of the American Southwest?a world far more complex, diverse, and morally ambiguous than the traditional portrayals of the Old West.

Texas and Northeastern Mexico 1630 1690

Texas and Northeastern Mexico  1630   1690
Author: Juan Bautista Chapa
Publsiher: University of Texas Press
Total Pages: 247
Release: 2010-06-28
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780292789845

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This authoritative, annotated translation of the 17th century text is essential reading for historians of New Spain and Spanish Texas. In the seventeenth century, South Texas and Northeastern Mexico formed El Nuevo Reino de León, a frontier province of New Spain. In 1690, Juan Bautista Chapa penned a richly detailed history of Nuevo León for the years 1630 to 1690. Although his Historia de Nuevo León was not published until 1909, it has since been acclaimed as the key contemporary document for any historical study of Spanish colonial Texas. This book offers the only accurate and annotated English translation of Chapa's Historia. In addition to the translation, William C. Foster also summarizes the Discourses of Alonso de León (the elder), which cover the years 1580 to 1649. The appendix includes a translation of Alonso (the younger) de León's previously unpublished revised diary of the 1690 expedition to East Texas and an alphabetical listing of over 80 Indian tribes identified in this book. Chapa’s Historia lists the names and locations of over 300 Indian tribes. This information, together with descriptions of the vegetation, wildlife, and climate in seventeenth-century Texas, make this book essential reading for ethnographers, anthropologists, and biogeographers, as well as students and scholars of Spanish borderlands history.

Dust Bowl Girls

Dust Bowl Girls
Author: Lydia Reeder
Publsiher: Algonquin Books
Total Pages: 303
Release: 2017-01-24
Genre: Sports & Recreation
ISBN: 9781616206536

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“Thrilling, cinematic . . . I loved every minute I spent with the bold, daring women of the Cardinals basketball team . . . The stuff of American legend” (Karen Abbott, New York Times–bestselling author). The Boys in the Boat meets A League of Their Own in this true story of a Depression-era championship women’s team. During the drought and financial crisis of the 1930s, Oklahoma basketball coach Sam Babb traveled from farm to farm recruiting talented, hardworking young women and offering them a chance at a better life: a free college education in exchange for playing on his basketball team, the Cardinals. And as Babb coached the Cardinals, something extraordinary happened. These remarkable athletes found a passion for the game and a heartfelt loyalty to one another and their coach—and they began to win. Combining exhilarating sports writing and exceptional storytelling, Dust Bowl Girls takes readers on the Cardinals’ intense, improbable journey all the way to an epic showdown with the prevailing national champions, helmed by the legendary Babe Didrikson. Lydia Reeder captures a moment in history when female athletes faced intense scrutiny from influential figures in politics, education, and medicine who denounced women’s sports as unhealthy and unladylike. At a time when a struggling nation was hungry for inspiration, this unlikely group of trailblazers achieved much more than a championship season. “A compelling, heartwarming story of a group of college students determined to accomplish the impossible. This is a book you can’t put down.” —The Denver Post “[A] great sports story about an underdog whose triumphs inspired a community that badly needed a lift in the midst of hard economic times. I can’t wait for the movie.” —The Oklahoman

Making the Chinese Mexican

Making the Chinese Mexican
Author: Grace Delgado
Publsiher: Stanford University Press
Total Pages: 320
Release: 2013-04-15
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780804783712

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Making the Chinese Mexican is the first book to examine the Chinese diaspora in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. It presents a fresh perspective on immigration, nationalism, and racism through the experiences of Chinese migrants in the region during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Navigating the interlocking global and local systems of migration that underlay Chinese borderlands communities, the author situates the often-paradoxical existence of these communities within the turbulence of exclusionary nationalisms. The world of Chinese fronterizos (borderlanders) was shaped by the convergence of trans-Pacific networks and local arrangements, against a backdrop of national unrest in Mexico and in the era of exclusionary immigration policies in the United States, Chinese fronterizos carved out vibrant, enduring communities that provided a buffer against virulent Sinophobia. This book challenges us to reexamine the complexities of nation making, identity formation, and the meaning of citizenship. It represents an essential contribution to our understanding of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands.

Polynesian researches

Polynesian researches
Author: William Ellis
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 470
Release: 1831
Genre: Electronic Book
ISBN: OXFORD:555001674

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From Apartheid to Democracy

From Apartheid to Democracy
Author: Katherine Elizabeth Mack
Publsiher: Penn State Press
Total Pages: 176
Release: 2015-06-18
Genre: Language Arts & Disciplines
ISBN: 9780271066387

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South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) hearings can be considered one of the most significant rhetorical events of the late twentieth century. The TRC called language into action, tasking it with promoting understanding among a divided people and facilitating the construction of South Africa’s new democracy. Other books on the TRC and deliberative rhetoric in contemporary South Africa emphasize the achievement of reconciliation during and in the immediate aftermath of the transition from apartheid. From Apartheid to Democracy, in contrast, considers the varied, complex, and enduring effects of the Commission’s rhetorical wager. It is the first book-length study to analyze the TRC through such a lens. Katherine Elizabeth Mack focuses on the dissension and negotiations over difference provoked by the Commission’s process, especially its public airing of victims’ and perpetrators’ truths. She tracks agonistic deliberation (evidenced in the TRC’s public hearings) into works of fiction and photography that extend and challenge the Commission’s assumptions about truth, healing, and reconciliation. Ultimately, Mack demonstrates that while the TRC may not have achieved all of its political goals, its very existence generated valuable deliberation within and beyond its official process.

Love on Trial An American Scandal in Black and White

Love on Trial  An American Scandal in Black and White
Author: Heidi Ardizzone,Earl Lewis
Publsiher: W. W. Norton & Company
Total Pages: 320
Release: 2002-05-17
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780393247466

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"Too important to be ignored....A fascinating look at America's obsession with race, pride, and privilege."—Essence When Alice Jones, a former nanny, married Leonard Rhinelander in 1924, she became the first black woman to be listed in the Social Register as a member of one of New York's wealthiest families. Once news of the marriage became public, a scandal of race, class, and sex gripped the nation—and forced the couple into an annulment trial. "A compelling read."—Boston Globe "This is a great story....Earl Lewis and Heidi Ardizzone tell it very well."—Chicago Tribune

The Blue and the Green

The Blue and the Green
Author: Jack Stauder
Publsiher: University of Nevada Press
Total Pages: 416
Release: 2016-03-22
Genre: Nature
ISBN: 9781943859115

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In The Blue and the Green, anthropologist Jack Stauder analyzes how large-scale political, social, and environmental processes have transformed ranching and rural life in the West. Focusing on the community of Blue, Arizona, Stauder details how the problems of overgrazing, erosion, and environmental stresses on the open range in the early twentieth century coincided with a push by the newly created US Forest Service to develop fenced grazing allotments on federal lands. Later in the twentieth century, with the enactment of the Endangered Species Act and other laws, the growing power of urban-based environmental groups resulted in the reduction of federal grazing leases throughout the West. The author combines historical research with oral interviews to explore the impact of these transformations on the ranchers residing in the Blue River Valley of eastern Arizona. Stauder gives voice to these ranchers, along with Forest Service personnel, environmental activists, scientists, and others involved with issues on “the Blue,” shedding light on how the ranchers’ rural way of life has changed dramatically over the course of the past century. This is a fascinating case study of the effects of increasing government regulations and the influence of outsiders on ranching communities in the American West.